WHERE IDEAS
INTERCONNECT

SPRING 2015

Beyond a Yardstick
March 26 - May 1, 2015


Measurement began when people started counting on their fingers.  Now we measure the incomprehensible, the invisible, and the untouchable: the size of the universe, electric currents in the brain, and the emotion aroused by music. Our spring 2015 series explores the nature of measuring, its current frontiers, and what it is telling us about our world and ourselves.


Six evening lectures and five morning seminars will provide a fascinating glimpse into how measurement is being used today.  


That’s not all! Join us for a special film screening of the time-spanning, high seas epic Longitude – the true story of a lone genius who solved the greatest scientific problem of his time.

All evening and morning events include a presentation by the speaker, refreshments, and an opportunity to ask questions.




Columbus Community Centre, 232 Spencer St. East, Cobourg

7:30 pm to approximately 9:30 pm

March 26
Measurement, mathematics and information technology

Dr. Ram Murty, Professor and Queen's Research Chair, Department of Mathematics, Queen's University, Kingston, ON


Einstein said: “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.” Nevertheless, science has advanced by continually refining the notion of counting and measurement. What things can be measured? What do we mean by measuring? What can modern mathematics tell us?


April 2, 2015

Behind the scenes in the world of art and design

Bob Hambly, Creative Director at Hambly & Woolley Inc.


Over the centuries, musicians, architects, artists and designers have used the Golden Ratio to establish proportion and harmony within their work. What makes the Golden Ratio special? What evidence is there to show its influence? Are there other ways measurement helps artists construct their work? Bob examines how unseen compositional frameworks and structures shape aesthetic decisions.


April 9, 2015

Measuring outer space: the accelerating universe

Dr. Raymond Carlberg, Professor, Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto


In 1993, scientists were startled to find that the universe is not just expanding: it is doing so at an ever-faster rate. An international team of astronomers is studying the nature of this acceleration at a giant telescope on Hawaii’s Big Island. Their measurements are clues to a cosmic puzzle: how the universe works on a very large scale.


April 16, 2015

Preventing stupid deaths: the politics of measuring global health crises

Dr. Joy Fitzgibbon, Research Fellow, Global Diplomacy Health Program, Munk School for Global Studies, University of Toronto


Haitians call deaths that could be prevented “stupid.” Health politics may be a problem – as happened in framing policies against multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Experts disagreed on ways to measure its incidence, effective counter-strategies, and funding capacities. Lessons learned can help against other threats, including Ebola.


April 23, 2015

Measuring inner space: deep brain stimulation and neural response

Dr. Karen D. Davis, Professor, Department of Surgery and Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto


Only the sufferer can say how bad the pain is. But MRI images of the brain can find patterns of connection and brain responses associated with pain. Mathematical models connected with these data may be able to predict a person’s vulnerability to pain and response to treatment.  That could open the door to individualized pain treatment.


April 30, 2015

Hit factors: the link between music and emotional response

Ernest Cholakis, Acoustic Researcher, Numerical Sound


Why do we respond differently to two interpretations of the same piece of music? With computer analysis, combined with a deep understanding of music, it is becoming possible to answer this question – and to measure the unseen characteristics that combine to create a pop hit.


Port Hope Public Library, 31 Queen Street
9:00 am to 11:00 am

March 27
Meditation: Measurement of the mind
Dr. Ram Murty, Professor and Queen's Research Chair, Department of Mathematics, Queen's University, Kingston, ON


April 10
The beginning of the end?
Dr. Raymond Carlberg, Professor, Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto


April 17
Preventing stupid deaths: What measures can we take?
Dr. Joy Fitzgibbon, Research Fellow, Global Diplomacy Health Program, Munk School for Global Studies, University of Toronto


April 24

Ethics and brain imaging measurements
Dr. Karen D. Davis, Professor, Department of Surgery and Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto


May 1
Technology in music
Ernest Cholakis, Acoustic Researcher, Numerical Sound


















October 31
Exploring innovation through archaeology
Carl Knappett, Walter Graham/Homer Thompson Chair in Aegean Prehistory, University of Toronto

November 7
The Archaeology of Community: Understanding social life in the Neolithic
Maria Theresia Starzmann, Assistant professor Archaeology, McGill University

November 14
Taming the wild peach and wild rice in China: The first biotechnology experts
Gary Crawford, Professor, Anthropology, University of Toronto

November 21
Understanding ancient pottery: A hands-on examination
Jane Francis, Associate Professor, Classics, Modern Language and Linguistics, Concordia University

November 28
From dumb brute to kissing cousins: Rewriting Neanderthal prehistory
Tristan Carter, Associate Professor Anthropology, McMaster University

All evening events and morning seminars include a presentation by the speaker, refreshments, and an opportunity to ask questions.



Sunday afternoon, April 19, 2015

Capitol Theatre
20 Queen Street,
Port Hope, ON  L1A 2Y7

10:30 AM

After one too many shipwrecks, the 18th British Parliament offered an unprecedented cash award to anyone who could devise a way to determine longitude at sea.

Creating a longitude-measuring device became the passion of rural clock maker John Harrison, and two centuries later, naval officer Rupert Gould became obsessed with ensuring Harrison's dismissed invention was recognized and rewarded.  

View this acclaimed film featuring Academy Award winner Jeremy Irons and Sir Michael Gambon in a theatre setting, and enjoy lunch during the intermission.


Tickets are $20 per person. Order your tickets today from our Tickets Page.
     

For more information, call Joanne Bonebakker at 905.349.3402.




our distinguished speakers on beyond a yardstick

Seminars

Lectures

Speakers

SpecialEvent

Karen D. Davis obtained her PhD from the Department of Physiology at the University of Toronto in 1988 and did a post-doctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University. She is a founding member of the University of Toronto Centre for the Study of Pain, a full Professor at the Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto, and Head and Senior Scientist of the Division of Brain, Imaging and Behaviour – Systems Neuroscience at Toronto Western Research Institute. View Dr. Davis’s TED-Ed video “How does your brain respond to pain?” here: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-does-your-brain-respond-to-pain-karen-d-davis

Karen Davis Anchor

Raymond Carlberg is a Professor of Astronomy at the University of Toronto. He earned his PhD at the University of British Columbia and was a NATO Fellow at the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Cambridge from 1980-82. Dr. Carlberg played a lead role in the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology galaxy surveys, the Supernova Legacy Survey, and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey – the first really deep survey of the sky.  He is a Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the Royal Society of Canada. Read more at http://www.cifar.ca/raymond-g-carlberg

Raymond Carlberg Anchor

Ernest Cholakis is the owner of Numerical Sounds, an audio technology company that sells unique content tools to aid professional and amateur musicians in producing contemporary music. Cholakis’ research in music technology has led to groundbreaking software/soundware applications including the world's first sampling of drone effects, used widely in feature films. Cholakis’ Reverb, Timbral Impulses and Tilt Filters are distributed by Austria’s Vienna Symphonic Library. In 2002, Britain’s “Sound on Sound” magazine featured Cholakis's research into the hidden ingredients between music and emotional responses. Read more at http://www.numericalsound.com

Ernest Cholakis Anchor

Joy D. Fitzgibbon, a Fellow of Trinity College, received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of Toronto and completed public health courses in the Faculty of Medicine there and at Johns Hopkins University. She has served as Deputy Director of the Global Health Diplomacy Program and of the G8 Research Group at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Dr. Fitzgibbon has lectured in the International Pediatric Emergency Medicine Elective and the Canadian Disaster and Humanitarian Response Training Program. Read more at http://www.ghdp.utoronto.ca/who.shtml

KarenJoy Fitzgibbon Anchor

Bob Hambly graduated from University of the Arts in Philadelphia in 1980. With his partner Barbara Woolley, he co-founded the multi-disciplinary graphic design firm Hambly & Woolley, recipient of over 350 design awards. A gifted illustrator and curator of the eclectic, Bob has been published in The New York Times Sunday Magazine, Time Magazine and The Globe and Mail. He has lectured on design at OCAD University, Sheridan College, York University, Royal Ontario Museum, Rotman School of Management and the Association of Registered Graphic Designers. Read more at http://www.hamblywoolley.com/

Bob Hambly Anchor

M. Ram Murty currently holds the Queen's Research Chair in Mathematics and Philosophy.  He obtained his PhD from MIT in 1980, joined the faculty of McGill University in the summer of 1982, and arrived at Queen’s in 1996. The recipient of a lengthy list of honours and awards, Dr. Murty is a member of the Royal Society of Canada, the Indian National Science Academy, and a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society. Professor Murty is the author of more than ten books on mathematics and over 200 research papers.  Read more at http://www.mast.queensu.ca/~murty/

Ram Murty Anchor